The best gaming smartphones in 2020

The best gaming smartphones in 2020

A 144 Hz display, great-sounding speakers, and a powerful state-of-the-art SoC. Gaming smartphones represent a niche market that is still struggling to find appeal amongst the general public. While they share some characteristics with "normal" high-end smartphones, the adjective "gaming" is more than just a marketing ploy. NextPit is here to help you make your choice with this arbitrary yet scalable list of the best gaming smartphones to enjoy in 2020 according to your budget.

Summary:

  1. RedMagic 5S: The more affordable high-end alternative
  2. Lenovo Legion Duel: The coolest gaming smartphone
  1. Realme X50: Mid-range performance with 120 Hz
  2. OnePlus 8T: The gaming smartphone that isn't a gaming smartphone
  1. Refresh rate and touch sampling rate
  2. Cooling and thermal throttling system
  3. Key criteria
  4. Compromises

Editor's Choice: Asus ROG Phone 3, the Best Smartphone Gaming in 2020

As with every other comparison that involves a list of the best smartphones, this is a personal choice of the author, who in this case would be me. This choice has obviously been debated among the editorial staff prior to publishing and I will therefore furnish you with my colleagues' recommendations should their opinion differ from mine.

NextPIT Asus ROG Phone 3 back
The Asus ROG Phone 3 is the best gaming smartphone on the market in 2020. / © NextPit

Rating

Bewertung Design und Handling

Pros

  • Snapdragon 865+ SoC and 12 /16 GB RAM
  • 144 Hz OLED screen
  • 270 Hz tactile sampling rate
  • 1ms response time
  • 6,000 mAh battery
  • Advanced interface and control centre
  • Cooling system
  • Very precise haptic triggers
 

Cons

  • Solid design
  • Decent camera configuration
  • No IP certification
  • Too many unnecessary accessories
  • "Only" 30 watts charging

The Asus ROG Phone 3 is a high-end smartphone that is gaming-oriented. It has virtually everything it needs to power your portable gaming experience: for a full-blown flagship that boasts of a 6.59-inch AMOLED display with a 144 Hz refresh rate, a Qualcomm Snapdragon 865+ SoC coupled with 12 GB or 16 GB of RAM, as well as a 6,000 mAh battery.

It has sold for £999 ever since its launch on July 22, which is still significantly cheaper than many of the other available high-end smartphones on the market today that are similar or worse, less well-equipped.

Its cooling system works in tandem with an enlarged ventilation chamber - which is an improvement over the ROG Phone 2, accompanied by a special graphite coating that helps limit overheating even during the lengthiest gaming sessions. I never noticed any thermal throttling happening during my tests nor in my daily usage pattern, even though I now use it as my main portable gaming console (while waiting to buy a PS5 in 2021).

The interface is also particularly interesting in terms of management and customisation when it concerns the performance of the ROG Phone 3. The "Armoury Crate" menu happens to be a true control centre that provides you with unique control over the operational aspects of the device (fan speed, CPU core timing, RAM management) by creating different presets for each game, if you wish.

asus rog phone 3 test complet xmode
The Armoury Crate of the ROG Phone 3 is an ultra-complete control centre. / © NextPit

The X mode which boosts performance is also very effective as you can see the difference when enjoying your game as well as in graphical benchmark results. Coupled with the attachable external fan via USB-C, you can really play for hours on end without ever feeling the temperature rise in your hands.

The 144 Hz AMOLED display also features a touch-sampling rate (the number of times the smartphone records finger contact per second) of 270 Hz and a response time of 1 millisecond. This provides an absolutely decisive advantage in terms of the smoothness courtesy of the speed of execution of touch commands which will certainly help you greatly in multiplayer games.

One of the only actual drawbacks of the Asus ROG Phone 3 would be the rather inconvenient placement of the USB-C port on the bottom right-hand side. It's a real shame about the ergonomics of a handset that you'll be holding in landscape mode most of the time.

Of course, you can plug an external fan on the left side (which is at the bottom when you hold the smartphone horizontally) where it boasts of a USB-C port and a 3.5mm jack. However, this is far from the optimal placement.

NextPit ASUS RoG Phone 3 fan ventilator
The external fan of the Asus ROG Phone 3 has a USB-C and 3.5mm jack adapter. / © NextPit

You can read the complete Asus ROG Phone 3 review by NextPit here

The best gaming smartphones that NextPit recommends in 2020

If I mention "smartphone gaming", it is not for nothing at all. Hence, I am going to talk about models that were explicitly designed for mobile gaming purposes. Logically, these are very high-end models, with premium specification sheets boasting of top-notch hardware. In order to offer a selection suitable for all budgets, I will therefore also list some other alternatives, although do not expect those to reside on the high-end spectrum.

RedMagic 5S: the more affordable alternative to the Asus ROG Phone 3

NextPIT RedMagic 5S back
The RedMagic 5S is the best alternative to the Asus ROG Phone 3 for a gaming smartphone in 2020. / © NextPit

Rating

Bewertung Design und Handling

Pros

  • Snapdragon 865 SoC and 8 GB/12 GB RAM
  • 144 Hz OLED screen
  • Tactile sampling rate of 240 Hz
  • Efficient temperature control
  • Complete game boost mode
  • Its price
  • 55 watts fast charging capability
 

Cons

  • Solid design
  • Camera module is average
  • 4,500 mAh battery
  • No IP certification
  • The "rustic" interface

A Snapdragon 865 chipset, a 144 Hz AMOLED screen, up to 12 GB of RAM, UFS 3.1 storage, a 64 MP triple camera setup, haptic triggers, and a 4,500 mAh battery - what is there not to love about the RedMagic 5S? The RedMagic 5S is a real powerhouse that retails for less than £600. The basic version, 8GB of RAM/128GB has been available since September 2nd for in Europe. A 12GB/256GB version is also available.

If you are looking for an affordable flagship that retails for less than £600, there are obviously better alternatives like the OnePlus 8T or the Xiaomi Mi 10T Pro. But this is clearly not the market that ZTE subsidiary Nubia is targeting with the RedMagic 5S. This smartphone fully assumes the gaming role and has invested a fair amount of effort into fulfilling this role. In terms of performance and customisation of the gaming experience, we can declare it to be a success.

The RedMagic is also cheaper than the other market leaders in the gaming segment such as the ROG Phone 3 or the BlackShark 3 Pro.

The raw performance of the Snapdragon 865 chipset is obvious and I was really impressed by the efficiency of the temperature control. The smartphone remained almost as cold as ice even after an hour of playing Call of Duty Mobile in high graphics settings.

The cooling system in this model is "version 4.0", as Nubia has christened it. The internal fan, liquid cooling coil, and graphite materials are part of the deal, just as the one found on the RedMagic 5G, but there is a new silver plate on the back of the device that helps facilitate heat transfer when using the Ice Dock device (an external fan accessory).

The interface still requires some fine-tuning but the control centre is a complete success when it comes to software implementation. In addition to tracking and setting the CPU and other clock speeds, the Game Boost menu also offers a digital wellness feature that helps track your game time. Depending on your game time statistics, the smartphone may suggest for you to take a break. An abhorrent idea for any self-respecting mobile gamer, but it is still a welcome option nonetheless.

nubia redmagic 5s review game boost menu
The Game Boost Menu on the Nubia RedMagic 5S is its biggest highlight. / © NextPit

The triggers are purely haptic, but their sensitivity is extremely accurate thanks to a tactile sampling rate of 320 Hz. Game Boost also offers other options which tend to be cool although they do not really add much in terms of functionality and usefulness.

For example, you can activate an aiming assistance mode, which permanently displays a crosshair on the screen. It's extremely handy when it comes to FPS titles that it could look like cheating to me. But I'm not going to complain about it.

nubia redmagic 5s review aiming asist
It's cheating! / © NextPit

The biggest flaw in this smartphone is undoubtedly the power button that is located under the volume knob when holding the device in landscape mode, which happens to be common on other smartphones but particularly hinders the use of the RedMagic 5S when one is about to indulge in some gaming. Not only does this button interfere with the "clips" to attach to your PS4 or Xbox One controller, but it will also lock your smartphone when you attempt to attach the "Ice Dock", which is an external fan.

But overall, Nubia's RedMagic 5S is a great and more affordable alternative to the Asus ROG Phone 3, if gaming happens to be your main criteria when purchasing a new smartphone.

NextPit RedMagic 5S fan
The poor button placement of the RedMagic 5S is its biggest flaw. / © NextPit

You can read the full RedMagic 5S review by NextPit here

Lenovo Legion Duel: the coolest gaming smartphone in 2020

NextPIT Lenovo Legion Duel back
The Lenovo Legion Duel is the most stylish gaming smartphone on the market in 2020. / © NextPit

Still being reviewed

 

For

  • Snapdragon 865+ SoC and 12 GB/16 GB RAM
  • 144 Hz OLED screen
  • 240 Hz tactile sampling rate
  • Pop-up camera module
  • 5,000 mAh battery
  • Cooling system
  • Very precise haptic triggers
  • 65 watts fast charging
 

Against

  • Interface and control centre not advanced enough
  • Lock button placement
  • Awards

Released on October 15, 2020, the Lenovo Legion Duel is the second smartphone on the market to feature the powerful Snapdragon 865+ chipset, similar to the Asus ROG Phone 3.

I am currently polishing and completing the review of this smartphone. But I can already say that this is the coolest gaming smartphone of the year. It was clearly designed for gamers as well as gaming content creators with its 20 MP "pop up" camera module (a motorised option that failed to gain traction in the past).

It makes perfect sense of having a retractable front camera that enables you to take full advantage of the 6.65-inch AMOLED screen with a 144 Hz refresh rate alongside a 240 Hz touch-sampling rate without any notches getting in the way! This is a big plus when it comes to immersion. This pop-up camera module was also designed for content creators who want to record their gameplay (game sessions) via a selfie perspective or even for streaming.

When you discover that Amazon has launched a streaming platform like Twitch albeit one that is dedicated to smartphone games in the form of GameOn, you can immediately see the usefulness of having such a device.

NextPit Lenovo Phone Duel L79031 legion
The Lenovo Legion Duel's pop-up front camera is a big advantage for gaming. / © NextPit

When it comes to performance, we are obviously looking at the top of the range capability thanks to Qualcomm's Snapdragon 865+ chipset that has been mated to either 12 GB or 16 GB of RAM. The benchmarks I was able to run illustrated this raw power well, and the temperature control proved to be quite efficient thanks to the integration of a dual liquid cooling system.

I noticed overheating (40°C) after several hours of play, but at no time whatsoever did I experience any thermal throttling. The smartphone maintained a constant level of performance and FPS throughout the game sessions.

The interface doesn't go as far as its competitors in customising performance though. But the "Legion Realm" menu provides you with a good overall view of key data related to SoC, RAM usage, temperature etc. You can switch to "Crawl" mode to boost the performance levels to the maximum.

The 5,000 mAh battery is based on two 2,500 mAh cells which are simultaneously recharged via USB-C over 65 watts. The placement of the USB-C port is also much better thought out than in the other models which make up this selection since it is located in the middle of the left side: making it perfect in terms of ergonomics when using the device in landscape mode. The placement of the lock button in the middle of the right-hand side, on the other hand, may hinder the use of a Bluetooth controller clip.

But what I love most about the Lenovo Legion Duel is its unashamed gaming-oriented design. It is just cool to look at and touch. We've got animated LEDs at the back, a ribbed coating behind that provides gamers with a better smartphone grip just in case your hands get too sweaty. The haptic triggers are also very precise and improve the already excellent ergonomics of this very good gaming smartphone.

If it was a little cheaper than the Asus ROG Phone 3, I would have forgiven these slight interface and ergonomics flaws and place this as a top recommendation. However, the ROG Phone 3 just proves to be a little more complete, although the Lenovo Legion Duel does carry plenty of clout and a visual identity to match, making it a rather unique proposition on the market which will seduce the geek inside of me. It is definitely the most "stylish" gaming smartphone of 2020, which will appeal to PC gaming owners who are absolutely in love with LED RGB setups on their gaming rigs.

NextPit's alternatives for a more affordable and/or more discreet gaming smartphone

The point here is to provide alternatives to pure gaming smartphones, which are necessarily high-end, more expensive and above all very visually appropriate to indicate it as such. Here, NextPit lists smartphones that are more versatile and/or more affordable but whose gaming possibilities are a little more extensive than those of their competitors in their respective price ranges.

Realme X50: the best value gaming smartphone in 2020

NextPIT Realme X50 5G back
The Asus ROG Phone 3 is the best gaming smartphone on the market in 2020. / © NextPit

Rating

Bewertung Design und Handling

For

  • Snapdragon 765G chipset
  • 120 Hz LCD screen
  • Decent price
 

Against

  • 180 Hz tactile sampling rate
  • 4,200 mAh battery
  • No liquid cooling
  • Game mode is too minimalist

The Realme has been available since August 11th at the price of £279 for a single 6 GB RAM/ 128 GB configuration. But in the meantime, the OnePlus Nord has been released on July 21st with a very similar specifications sheet and price.

A 120 Hz LCD screen, Snapdragon 765G chipset, and 4,200 mAh battery makes it hard to distinguish the Realme X50 from its cousin, the OnePlus Nord. But in terms of raw performance, the Realme X50 does better than the Nord, which is a pleasant surprise since the latter has been considered to be more optimised for gaming.

In this comparison, I performed three rounds of several graphics and CPU benchmarks on the Realme X50 and OnePlus Nord. On paper, the Realme X50 performs better than OnePlus Nord. It's hard to say how well the two smartphones perform in real life and everyday usage since the performance of the two smartphones are very similar. As the OnePlus Nord has advantages over some games, such as Fortnite, which can run at 45 FPS on it while being limited to just 30 FPS in the settings on the Realme X50.

But it's a nice surprise to see Realme in the mix of a list that would normally not see it make the cut. All the more so since OnePlus is really touting its Fnatic mode that claims to optimise CPU, GPU, RAM, and so on.

The game mode on the Realme X50 only offers a "Competitive" mode that does not indicate what kind of optimisations are being made when it is activated. The 4,200 mAh battery provides a solid battery life for conventional use that clearly seems ridiculous when compared to other models in this selection.

smartphone game mode realme
The game mode of the Realme X50 is too limited. / © NextPit

Overall, the Realme X50 is not a gaming smartphone per se. It is a classic mid-range smartphone but boasts of a full set of gaming features. It is slightly better off functioning as a gaming device than its competitors in this price range. I wouldn't go so far as to say it has hit the middle ground jackpot, but if you want a high-performance gaming smartphone without breaking the bank, it's clearly a good alternative.

It is currently available for less than £400, and if you want a little more performance without totally making the switch to the world of pure gaming smartphones, you can opt for the Realme X50 Pro, which is slightly more expensive although it can be found going for less than £500.

You can read the complete Realme X50 5G review by NextPit here

OnePlus 8T: the least geeky gaming smartphone on the market

NextPIT OnePlus 8T back
The OnePlus 8T is a high-end gaming smartphone that doesn't look like one. / © NextPit

Rating

Bewertung Design und Handling

For

  • Snapdragon 865 SoC and 8 GB/12 GB RAM
  • 120 Hz OLED screen
  • 240 Hz touch sampling rate
  • Simple but effective Fnatic mode
  • Cooling system
  • 65 watts fast charging
 

Against

  • Gaming mode not the most advanced on this list
  • 4,500 mAh battery
  • No IP certification
  • Screen with punch-hole

The OnePlus 8T has been available since October 20, 2020 at a price of £549 for the 8GB/128GB version on the official OnePlus and Amazon stores.

The OnePlus 8T comes with a 6.55-inch AMOLED flat panel display in Full HD+ resolution with a 120 Hz refresh rate and 240 Hz touch-sampling rate, which is not so common on a "classic", non-gaming flagship device.

Underneath the hood lies a Snapdragon 865 chipset, a 4,500 mAh battery with the new highly efficient Warp Charge 65T fast charge capability.

In terms of raw power, the OnePlus 8T has all of the necessary weapons required to compete with the best gaming smartphones on the market such as the ROG Phone 3 from Asus or the Nubia RedMagic 5S. In the graphical benchmarks I used for my tests, the OnePlus 8T always managed to maintain a more or less stabilised framerate of around 30 FPS and this, without ever exceeding the critical temperature reading of 39°C.

oneplus 8t review fnatic mode
The Fnatic mode of the OnePlus 8T and its pop-up windows feature is virtually useless when gaming. / © NextPit

OnePlus has moved the camera module to a different place as compared to the OnePlus 8 in order to obtain a larger surface area for the steam chamber, a dozen temperature sensors, as well as 5 graphite plates, and silicone grease everywhere to limit overheating.

The dedicated Fnatic gaming mode is less advanced than what pure gaming smartphones offer, but the interface is much more user-friendly. You can make the game menu appear contextually, like a pop-up once you are in the game. You have a temperature indicator, battery, as well as the ability to have Instagram or WhatsApp in windowed mode (what's the point?!), block notifications, false positives, etc.

In short, it's a fairly complete high-end smartphone and is the understated alternative in the top end list. The gaming experience is worthy of a gaming smartphone, but the device is not too gaming-oriented and it can be used perfectly as a daily driver.

You can read the full OnePlus 8T review by NextPit here

What can we expect from a gaming smartphone in 2020?

The idea behind the concept of a gaming smartphone is not to just offer a powerful smartphone. Any flagship released since 2018 is fully capable of running almost any of the most demanding mobile games in high graphics settings, as well as some mid-range models.

Logically, raw power is an essential factor, but it's not the only one. In the gaming category, we will logically find many high-end smartphones, equipped with the latest Snapdragon SoCs such as the Snapdragon 865.

Refresh rate and touch sampling rate

But an even more important criteria would be the fluidity of the user experience. The quality of the screen will therefore be a very important point, with a majority sporting OLED displays, although it would be those equipped with especially high refresh rates that exceed 120 Hz or even 144 Hz which win out. The tactile sampling rate, which is the number of times the screen records a touch with your fingers per second, is a key factor and generally lies around the 240 Hz mark for optimal responsiveness.

The higher this rate, the more accurate the gestures you make by touching your screen will be captured. This is especially important in FPS titles to ensure more responsive and accurate aiming, translating to more accurate targeting. If you switch from 240 to 180 Hz, you'll notice the difference, as if the sensitivity of the aiming is reduced drastically. You need to make longer, more pronounced sweeps, which is far from optimal in a fast-paced FPS title.

Think of it as the DPI (dots per inch) of a PC gaming mouse. The goal being that the mouse, aka touch controls, react to the most subtle movements possible to ensure the greatest possible degree of responsiveness.

Cooling system and thermal throttling

Of course, the gaming range must be equipped with a big battery and a good cooling system in order to prevent any overheating from happening. You'll find the most advanced features in the gaming segment that even "normal" flagships don't offer with liquid cooling, more advanced ventilation chambers, special graphite coatings, and batteries that have a capacity of 5,000 mAh or more.

In contrast to the classic smartphone that is used in a conventional manner, gaming usage can be rather intensive as it places the components of the smartphone through the wringer. This is all the more the case as gaming sessions tend to be rather lengthy. That's why gaming smartphones generally offer better thermal throttling management, i.e. automatic performance limitation to prevent overheating above 39°C.

I do not have precise tools to measure this notion in my tests. Recently, the 3DMark benchmark offered a test called "Wild Life". This test simulates an intense game session with graphics pushed to the maximum settings anywhere from 1 to 20 minutes long. The whole idea is to see how the smartphone behaves once it is pushed to its limits.

This benchmark then furnishes us with the temperature variation, the FPS rate, and battery consumption rate. Temperatures will always rise, it is an inevitable reality based on the laws of physics. But the more the FPS fluctuates as the temperature rises, the more you can measure the amount of thermal throttling.

best gaming smartphones thermal throttling example
Over an intense 20 minute session, the Huawei Mate 40 Pro heats up less than the ROG Phone 3 but the performance is also less stable. / © NextPit

In this example above, we can see that the Huawei Mate 40 Pro has heated up significantly less than the Asus ROG Phone 3, maintaining the maximum temperature at 33°C versus 40°C for the ROG Phone. But it can also be noted that the framerate is far more inconsistent than on the Asus smartphone.

Just compare the two graphs on the far left of the image above, the difference between the first loop (1 minute) and the last loop (20 minutes) is obvious on the Mate 40 Pro. The ROG Phone 3 maintains a very similar level of performance.

This is where we can see one of the impacts of thermal throttling. In order to protect against any form of overheating, the Mate 40 Pro limits performance, while the ROG Phone 3 which is better equipped with a cooling system, can afford to operate at higher temperatures for a longer period of time while maintaining a steady level of performance.

Gaming smartphones will be far more capable than "normal" smartphones of pushing that limit and maintaining consistently high performance for as long as possible.

As one reader pointed out to me, do the iPhone 12 and Galaxy S20 have all of these conditions in place? No. Their power gives them some versatility but they are not gaming smartphones. Or maybe all flagships are gaming smartphones, in which the name doesn't make sense in any case.

On the other hand, unlike more classic smartphones, gaming models often tend to neglect the quality of the camera module. They also often have a very gaming-oriented design, complete with LEDs on all sides. They have also been designed to be rather massive and heavy, which doesn't please everyone.

Key criteria:

  • 144 Hz OLED display
  • 240 Hz tactile sampling rate
  • Snapdragon 865 SoC
  • Efficient cooling system
  • Large battery capacity with an average of 5,000 mAh
  • Quick charge capability
  • Accessories (fan, USB-C adapter/3.5mm jack)
  • Highly accurate battery and performance utilities

Compromises

  • Eye-catching design packed with LEDs
  • Massive and rather heavy smartphones
  • Unsightly gaming interfaces
  • Generally expensive
  • Average camera performance

Are gaming smartphones still too niche?

Let's understand each other, I would really like to see gaming smartphones with specification sheets that are on steroids released. I personally play a lot of games on my smartphone. Hence, I know very well that none of the games currently available require such a powerful machine, whether native mobile games (on the App Store or Play Store) or even on cloud gaming.

And even if they did (but they don't), the vast majority of mobile gamers don't play resource-intensive games anyway. Gaming smartphones are simply too far ahead of their time, and the mobile gaming market is not keeping up with the technical ambitions pursued by different manufacturers such as Asus, BlackShark or Nubia.

What I mean by this is, the "gaming" argument on smartphones is not yet strong enough to make this niche a large enough consumer- and fan-base to be profitable. It's wonderful to have such a powerful monster in your hands, but who else but a geek like me would be willing to transform a handheld game console into a smartphone for everyday use?

And who among those playing Candy Crush, Fortnite, and other mini-games that are aplenty in mobile app stores require that much power? It is basically overkill. That's where the mainstream side of the ROG Phone 3 comes in to capture consumers who can get confused by the gaming aspect of things.

144 Hz display, Snapdragon 865+, 16 GB RAM - Isn't that a bit "too much"?

I have devoted an entire guide to this question which I have highlighted below and which I invite you to read if this summary is not exhaustive enough for you.

But to cut a long story short, we do not need the latest Snapdragon, Kirin, Exynos, or whatever chipset. A top-of-the-line SoC from last year or even 2018 may be all you need, provided you adjust your expectations in terms of graphics.

No. However, I would always advise you to choose the latest and most powerful model for an optimal experience without any compromises. This all depends on whether your budget allows it, of course.

You also don't need as much RAM as you do on a PC game with 10, 12, or 16 GB. The 6 GB or 8 GB of RAM that is currently the market standard is more than enough. This is surely the point where various manufacturers tend to trumpet their hardware which makes it all the more ostentatious.

However, if there's one thing that's not overboard, it's the screen refresh rate. The latter, when pushed at 90 Hz minimum, is far from being a gimmick. And this precise criteria has a direct and significant impact on the quality of the playing experience.

As for the screen, another key notion would be the touch-sampling rate. Specifically, it's the number of times per second that the screen records a touch with your finger. Expressed in Hz, this data is important to ensure the best possible smoothness and response time of tactile commands. Generally, you should aim for 240 Hz for an optimal experience. This is very different from the refresh rate, which is also expressed in Hz.

So yes, gaming smartphone manufacturers are overdoing it. You do not need so much power to play under good conditions. But you can hardly blame the manufacturers for wanting to push the performance of their devices to the extreme, can you?

Gaming modes on smartphone, it works or not?

What if we overclock our smartphones? The idea sounds absurd but more and more manufacturers are integrating "game" or "gaming" modes to their Android skins that are supposed to boost or optimise the performance of their smartphones. How does it work and more importantly, does it work? The answer can be found in the complete guide shown below, which I will summarise in a brief manner here.

Fnatic mode on OnePlus, Game Tools on Samsung, X-Mode on Asus or GPU Turbo at Huawei, the list goes on. For some time now on some smartphones, you have been able to improve the graphical performance of your device for a better gaming experience.

To find out if they really work, I've performed several series of graphical benchmark tests as well as hands-on tests. Regarding the benchmarks, I opted for the software that we usually use at the writing desk for our smartphone reviews.

Truth be told, these gaming modes are only really useful for the "Do not disturb" functions they offer. But they don't fundamentally provide better performance.

Benchmark comparison:

Gaming Modes
Game mode: on GeekBench 5 Single Geekbench 5 Multi PassMark Disk PassMark Memory 3D Mark Slingshot Extreme 3D Mark Vulkan 3D Mark Slingshot 3.0
ROG Phone 3 965 3351 111637 28722 7723 7026 9767
OP Nord 617 1891 58248 21260 3274 3063 4573
Realme X50 616 1934 59550 22502 3326 3117 4652
Game mode: off GeekBench 5 Single Geekbench 5 Multi PassMark Disk PassMark Memory 3D Mark Slingshot Extreme 3D Mark Vulkan 3D Mark Slingshot 3.0
ROG Phone 3 966 3320 98869 28387 7109 6385 9425
OP Nord 611 1896 55190 21496 3271 3053 4585
Realme X50 620 1923 57078 22282 3335 3108 4641

But benchmarks are not 100% reliable, and some manufacturers cheat to obtain better scores. So I did some hands-on testing to see if a difference in performance could be felt in real-world conditions when playing. To do so, I focused on the FPS rate.

And I noticed that in use, the improvement brought by gaming modes can be quantified more significantly than through benchmark tests. The FPS rate is a key criterion for judging the quality of a gaming experience.

The fact that game modes allow more FPSs to be displayed on the screen is a good argument to defend their usefulness, which however could seem to be anecdotal at best, and totally useless at worst.

In absolute terms, a gaming mode will never perform actual miracles and transform an old bike into a war machine. The improvements will be incremental at best and are in no way transcendental. Above all, the performance boost comes up against the notion of thermal throttling, a software failsafe that clamps of performance in order to limit overheating.

So we can't say it is a form of marketing bullshit in all intellectual honesty. But rather than providing a real boost, gaming modes offer a little boost at best.

How did NextPit select its best gaming smartphones in 2020?

As explained in the introduction, this list is an arbitrary one since it is based on the preferences of the author (in this case, me) and the rest of the editorial staff (the list was discussed among all the reviewers).

We decided not to make a catch-all list and to select only the best gaming smartphones according to several categories so as not to make the selection confusing, with possibly the best alternatives to make a more informed comparison alongside taking into consideration the budget allocated to different consumers.

But the goal here is not to rank the list in order of greatest to the least. Purchasing a gaming smartphone meets a very specific need and use, it is a niche market, after all. It is therefore useless to include classic flagships or smartphones that were not designed for mobile gaming in the first place, although their raw power may allow limited gaming usage.

The selected models are nevertheless selected on the basis of certain objective criteria such as price, performance (as observed by benchmarks), their technical specifications, etc.

As for a review, this list is the product of several subjective opinions but is always partly supported by objective and verifiable elements. We also remain attentive to the community by taking into account readers' recommendations in the comments to populate the selection.

In essence, only models that have been reviewed at the time of publishing were selected. The smartphone is put into context with the current state of the market, taking into account possible price reductions, the release of new competing models, its availability for purchase, etc. If a model is not available, it will be replaced by a new one (deservedly so) on paper to be part of the selection. Seeing that there are models that we could not review, we have also included them by basing our recommendations on the opinion of competing tech sites that have reviewed those.

What do you think of this selection? Which models do you think we have forgotten and deserve to be included? Do you find the advice and methodology sections useful? What do you think of this new format? Give us your feedback in the comments section!

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38 comments

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  • The best gaming phone is also one of the best 'consoles' you can get. No, really - we're serious. Although phones aren't a traditional games machine, the mobile space is one of the most vibrant in all of gaming nonetheless.


  • God, my greatest love, this is black shark 2.0. I just sleep and see myself opening the box and taking it out. Judging by what I saw at the presentation, this is the best value for money.


  • Everything is going to buying flagman smartphone


  • Can i get one free


  • Helpful article, I will go for S9


  • I think Samsung Galaxy A70 is one of the best


  •   46
    Deactivated Account Dec 31, 2018 Link to comment

    I like this gaming phone from Doogee the S70 lite rugged gaming phone.
    https://www.doogee.cc/detail/ip68-rugged-smartphone_s70lite/140


  • S9, gaming,? Funny. You have to charge it after 30 minutes. 😂😂


  • Please update the article. All the old phones are there in list... 👎👎👎


    • We've just updated our list again!


      • GASB Aug 10, 2017 Link to comment

        Reallyl? Are you recomending the Galaxy S8 for gaming, when it has poor GPU performance? The best phones for games are the phones with Snapdragon 820/821. Please you just do well your homework.

        Sorry for my words, but I hate this marketing that conceals with tecnology...

        www.youtube.com/watch?v=064yCZHNWf4&t=158s
        www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-GcLKamGPM&t=203s


  •   46
    Deactivated Account Jan 28, 2017 Link to comment

    What about the LG V20 the perfect phone for gaming. With the removable battery you can play all day. AndroidPit you are so biased in your phone coverage it is pitiful.

    SorinDeactivated Account


  • The fact that the HTC 10 doesn't have an amoled display isn't necessary a bad thing, people talk like amoled displays are superior, when in fact amoled displays aren't as sharp, and while the high contrast may seem better in some cases, it provides a very unnatural picture, much like the camera on the S7. The HTC 10 actually outperforms the Galaxy S7 in many ways, the HTC 10 scored 30,000 higher according the antutu benchmark scores listed on the site, and the HTC 10 received the highest DXOMARK score of 88, (despite the S7 having the same score the 10 did better with still images which put it ahead), the 10 has better audio microphones, and speakers. The HTC 10 is water resistant just not as well as the S7, but considering your far more likely to drop your phone and break it than drop it in 3 ft of water, the metal body proves better than the S7's glass body, Not to mention the HTC 10 has uh-oh protection which covers the phone in any worst case scenario. The HTC 10 doesn't have all the bloatware found on the S7, which will weigh on the phones performance in the long run, the HTC 10 has adotpable storage, and receives Android updates within 15 days of release while Samsung takes months to get updates. The HTC 10 is the best all around device on the market right now.


  • Moto E LTE with Snapdragon 410. 4.5" screen pushing 960x540 resolution, makes it a no brainer everywhere I want to go device. Can find them for every carrier under $30, refurbs for $5, and it plays every android game with fair ease for on the go gaming.

    Sure a nice tablet for couch gaming, with a great resolution, but you cant beat a 2390mAH battery, running what would essentially be a 'Nintendo' level of handheld phone. There are other variants out there, with 410s, running 2Gb of RAM, but if you keep the screen res to the 960x540 range you'll be greeted with plenty of devices that are capable of the latest games your shield can play, while on the go for a much more friendly on the go price (breaks, wear down. It's even got a splash proof coating on it for longevity).


  • Currently I have an Xperia T3, which I kind of love. I love the Xperia's but since I am a phone gamer, those can be shit too. My Xperia T3 is good overall, but when it comes to games... No. Just no. This is not a gaming phone.
    So, after this phone dies. I obviously want a new one. I'm thinking of abandon the Xperia series (I have been with them since Xperia Mini Pro) and get a really good gaming phone. I really don't like buttons, I prefer touch-buttons. Large screens is a must.
    1) Gaming phone
    2) Touch buttons only
    3) Large screen
    Please help me find my perfect phone!


  • Tilton Jul 11, 2016 Link to comment

    No G5? WTF

    Deactivated Account


  • Lame no note series listed here, and my note 3 is still amazing at gaming

    Deactivated Account


  •   46
    Deactivated Account Jun 9, 2016 Link to comment

    The Note 4 is the best for gaming big screen, Micro SD, replicable battery so you don't have to worry about running out of power.


  • Anand Jun 9, 2016 Link to comment

    Why Galaxy Note series is not listed? Note have always had amazing big screen with beefy flagship hardware for it's time.


  • Lg G flex 2 should be in there too. I don't understand why ppl complain about g flex 2 i mean its super fast and it can play all the games at max graphics. But since ppl didn't buy this device a lot it doesn't have any custom roms thanks to lg's locked bootloader. Waiting for xda g4 owners to find a solution.


  • for the price of the most smartphones you can get a mid range gamimg pc or at least a console. ->kind of useless to buy a "gaming" smartphone


  • Nexus 6P for screen / battery
    HTC 10 for audio

    All I need now is for a Chinese, or Korean, Smartphone manufacturer to deliver an affordable Tablet with these impressive features (stock Android OS Marshmallow with quick update to Android OS N) ;)


  • Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge is the best. I think.


  • Man tough choices. Probably have to go with the S7 because it is 'set up' for gaming. Also, what game is in the last picture?


  • Please do a article on mid range phones too......especially for their gaming performance


  •   31
    Deactivated Account Apr 21, 2016 Link to comment

    careful shopping around gets me a warranted UK spec S7 or HTC 10 for about £500.... I really expect the best gaming experience at that price range.. A UK N6 at £350 with regular software/security updates....
    and there's gotta be some mid range stuff out there that does great gaming at a reasonable price..


  • I expected some cheap options:-\


  •   46
    Deactivated Account Apr 21, 2016 Link to comment

    I think the best gaming phone would be the LG V10 because of the screen size and the replaceable battery you don't have to worry about running out of power just stick a new battery in and keep going. The Snapdragon 808 will still handle the games. My old S3 still does, so I know it can.


    • Rich D Apr 21, 2016 Link to comment

      It's too heavy to hold threw a game


      •   46
        Deactivated Account Apr 21, 2016 Link to comment

        If less than an once difference makes it to heavy for you. You need to go to the gym. People game with tablets which are far heavier. I really do not think weight is much of a factor.


  • anvil Apr 21, 2016 Link to comment

    OnePlus 1 or 2, are also a good choice as they have 3100 and 3200 battery capacities and have a large screen size.

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