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Apple's next-gen Watch to enable accurate blood pressure monitoring

NextPit Apple Watch SE 2022 Compass 2
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Ever since the first Apple Watch was introduced, the smartwatch lineup continued to evolve by adding vital features every year. There is, however, one key feature that is still missing even on Apple's Watch Series 8 and Watch Ultra—which is blood pressure monitoring. A new patent reveals how the next Apple Watch may be able to solve that.

Unlike on the previous patent where the blood pressure component is attached to the smartwatch, the new filing suggests that the entire watch itself will be part of the monitoring system. The latter also consists of an inflatable cuff and bedside monitor in addition to a watch or tracker as a portable device based on the finding that was uncovered by PatentlyApple.

Apple's blood pressure monitoring system

Rather than an on-demand function, the system is designed to work when the user is sleeping. There is also a specific criterion including the time on which the measurement could be based to avoid disruptions and to produce a more accurate reading.

It is safe to assume that data gathered could be sent to the wearable like the Apple Watch or the tabletop monitor. These separate devices could also provide the other needed biometrics data such as temperature and heart rate readings to supplement the blood pressure level.

Apple's blood pressure monitoring system with a Watch Series
Apple's blood pressure monitoring using external components / © Patently Apple

Although the patent only correlates to an Apple smartwatch or fitness tracker as an accessory, it might indicate the improved uses of the device. On that note, we don't exclude the possibility that Apple could still introduce a smartwatch capable of blood pressure monitoring in the near future.

With wearables getting crucial features, do you think that a smartwatch could someday replace your entire smartphone? Let us know your thoughts in the comment section.

Source: PatentlyApple

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