T-Mobile confirms: Cyberattack could affect 100 million customers

T-Mobile confirms: Cyberattack could affect 100 million customers

T-Mobile USA has been the victim of a major cyberattack over in the USA. This has already been reported by the media over the weekend, but it has now been officially confirmed by the company. The extent of the damage remains unclear as at press time. According to reports, over 100 million people could have been affected.

In a statement issued by T-Mobile, the company mentioned that it had not yet been able to determine whether personal customer information was also compromised. However, website Motherboard reported earlier this weekend that there was an offer of data of more than 100 million people being made available on the web. According to the portal, this data would most probably be the result of T-Mobile USA's servers being successfully hacked. 

In addition to the name and address of the victims, their phone number, social security number, and driver's license data would also have been compromised. In short, all the data required to commit full-scale identity theft in the US does seem to be available to the highest bidder, not to mention all of its consequences.

According to Spiegel Online (a German online magazine), Bleeping Computer has also published screenshots from the Darknet, on which the data of at least 30 million customers was offered. The hackers demanded $280,000 in the form of Bitcoin to obtain this data.

Security loopholes closed, T-Mobile remains mum on overall damage suffered

The company is convinced that it has plugged whatever security loopholes that were present prior for now. In addition, T-Mobile USA did mention that it is still examining just which part of their data were accessed by the hackers. Digital forensics on such a scale could take some time to complete, and only until then will it be possible to name the exact number of affected customer accounts.

Deutsche Telekom currently holds an approximate 43 percent stake in the American subsidiary. However, it has de facto control over the company through a deal with the Japanese company Softbank.

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  • Jason Llewellyn 1 month ago Link to comment

    How many breaches does T-Mob need to have, before they fix their problems?


  • storm 1 month ago Link to comment

    I use t-mobile, but prepaid. So they don't have all that sort of data on me.