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Apple could be forced to allow third-party App stores on iPhones

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It seems like hell may freeze over the strict practice of Apple closing its ecosystem from competition could finally end, at least in the European region. If the new Digital Markets Act (DMA) is enacted into law in Europe, Apple will be forced to allow its iPhone and iPad users access to third-party application stores and apps not found on their own App Store.


TL;DR

  • Installing third-party app stores, applications in iPhone will be allowed.
  • DMA act is already agreed on and will be voted as law this year.
  • Apple and other companies have little to no choice but to follow.

More services will work seamlessly between different ecosystems and apps

The new DMA reached by both the European Council and European Parliament is not limited to third-party stores and applications. It also targets big companies and services with large monthly users counts. The providers are required that their messaging apps open up and are interoperable to different third-party services. This makes the basic functions and content compatible with different services.

Another scope of the DMA is the introduction of third-party payment systems inside Apple's App Store. Consequently, users would have options when transacting inside the app store. This is supplemented by the fact that Epic Games filed a lawsuit against Apple for blocking the developer's payment option for Fortnite game purchases on the App store.

While valid to laptops and MacBooks, Apple could let its iOS users uninstall and change the default applications such as internet browser and other system apps. We have already seen this functionality to Android devices for many years now, but not to this extent, and we can't imagine how Apple will implement this.

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Sideloading third-party apps could open more security risks to iPhones and iPads / © NextPit

Sensitive data could be at risk, but more companies will benefit

The biggest concern of Apple if this act becomes a law is that their devices – particularly the iPhones and iPads – will be exposed to more security breaches. It will also risk sensitive data stored in Apple devices and services; a sentiment that Tim Cook also aired.

It's almost an end-game for Apple since the law is inevitable. The company, however, could just add extra security parameters similar to what Google has done with their Android OS, given that the device manufacturers have major roles in protecting their own users.

Not only is this future law beneficial to most users, it will also help smaller companies to have a fair fight and more chances of competing against the goliaths like Apple and Facebook. It will also encourage entities to further innovate and develop despite the financial restrictions they are facing when compared to its competition.

Are you in favor of this act? Do you support sideloading 3rd party apps and store iPhones and iPads? Let us know your thoughts in the comment section.

Source: TheVerge

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  • storm 7 months ago Link to comment

    The locked app store aspect of modern phones has been a negative. I much prefer to go the developer or owner than a do nothing aggregator taking 30% for nothing.


    • Jade Bryan 7 months ago Link to comment

      I agree. Users own the device thus they have the authority on what to install in it.