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Would you trade your Android for the next iPhone SE?

Would you trade your Android for the next iPhone SE?

Samik Chaterjee, analyst at J.P. Morgan, has made an interesting and rather bold prediction for the upcoming iPhone SE (2022). According to the financial expert, more than 1.4 billion Android users in the world could make a switch to the new iPhone. That would mean that half of all Android owners would now switch to Apple.


TL;DR

  • A J.P. Morgan analyst says that 1.4 billion Android users could buy the new iPhone SE (2022).
  • The iPhone SE (2022) could be Apple's first budget smartphone with 5G.
  • So far, there have already been some users who have switched to the iPhone SE models.

The new iPhone SE (2022) is the first budget smartphone from Apple that could come with 5G connectivity. Certainly, this is a new feature that many have been asking for, and also makes the device more interesting to many than the previous SE smartphones. The financial expert said that the 5G feature would be the main reason for people moving from Android to iOS. Still, the claim that 1.4 billion Android users would switch to Apple sounds a bit utopian.

Even if the low-cost iPhone offers a good alternative to Android smartphones and doesn't hit the wallet too hard, Chaterjee seems to overestimate himself. Google itself states that more than 3 billion devices in the world run Android. Thus, every second Android user would have to switch to an iPhone SE to meet the prediction. I myself also use an Android smartphone and couldn't imagine ever switching to Apple.

A bold prediction: How realistic is it?

So far, little information is known about Apple's new entry-level model. Only the design, which is strongly reminiscent of the iPhone SE (2020), and 5G compatibility are all but certain.  The SE iPhones were created by Apple to offer an affordable alternative to the otherwise quite expensive alternatives - without having to give up Apple technology and especially iOS 15.

As a financial analyst at a bank like J.P. Morgan, a person has a lot of power in the stock market. A single prediction can cause companies to take losses in the billions. Samik Chaterjee is a highly respected analyst who has often been right in the past. How realistic are his statements this time? Even though NextPit is not read by 1.3 billion people, let's ask for your opinion for once:

Are you considering switching from Android to an iPhone SE 2022?
View results

What do you think about this statement? Do you think many Android users will switch to Apple? Take part in the survey and write it in the comments! We are looking forward to it!

Via: Android Authority Source: Reuters

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3 comments

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  • DickB 1 month ago Link to comment

    I tried Apple with the 2020 SE, even switched from Tab S4 to iPad Air. Even after jailbreaking ios 13 build and using ios 14 beta, couldn't hack the UI. Waited for the Note 20 Ultra - the longest four months of my life. (Two bottom firing speakers on whatever the newest iPad Air was at the time were a joke.)


    • Camila Rinaldi
      • Admin
      • Staff
      1 month ago Link to comment

      Thank you so much for sharing your experience with switching devices. To be honest, I never used the iPhone SE, and I do like my iPhone 11 Pro Max because of the Apple ecosystem - I love the Apple Watch. But my main device is the Pixel 6 Pro and I enjoy Android 12 a lot. If I didn't trade my Android for an iPhone two years ago, I don't see myself doing it in 2022! ;)


      • DickB 1 month ago Link to comment

        The Apple ecosystem is excellent. My wife is an iPhone user and it has many strengths. My problem with it is probably the result of rooting and tinkering with my Android phone for years. However, as Android UIs have improved (e. g. less bloatware and more themeing options), rooting is less important to me. That - and Apple's longer software support for older devices - is why I decided to make the switch to ios, but the lack of flexibility for the iPhone (iPad UI did not bother me as much - use it differently) was a bridge too far for me.

        (Apple's decision to force upper left icon justification - particularly in the age of larger screens - was the beginning of my disappointment. That said, Apple is a good system, just not for a 73-year-old man pretty set in his ways and expectations.)

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